Are you tired of Sleep Talking?

Sleep Talking can be dangerous. Whether you’re the boyfriend or the girlfriend, if you whisper the wrong name, you can find yourself in deep trouble! Even worse if you whisper your SO’s name and you keep talking about everything that annoyed you about them during the day.

Almost all of us have at some point been told that we were talking in our sleep the night before. It can be a disturbing thing to hear. “Did I say anything embarrassing?” we might wonder, or, “Did I spill the beans?” There’s also the possibility that our words revealed some deep subconscious desire of which we are normally unaware. In any case, we are morbidly curious: “What did I say?”

Usually, nothing interesting. Studies have found that most sleep speeches are brief, nonsensical utterances lasting just one or two seconds rather than noteworthy ruminations.

Sleep talking, also known as somniloquy, may occur during both the REM (rapid eye movement) and non-REM sleep phases. When it happens during REM sleep — the stage during which we dream — it’s caused by “motor breakthrough” of dream speech: One’s mouth and vocal cords, usually inactive when we’re sleeping, briefly get switched on, and words spoken by one’s character in a dream are spoken out loud. Sleep talking may also occur during “transitory arousals,” when a sleeper becomes half-awake while transitioning from one stage of non-REM sleep to another. In both cases, it happens when certain aspects of wakefulness intrude during our sleep time, allowing us to talk (but preventing us from making much sense).

https://www.livescience.com/33794-people-talk-sleep.html

Causes of Sleep Talking

Sleep talking may be brought on by stress, depression, sleep deprivation, day-time drowsiness, alcohol, and fever. In many instances sleep talking runs in families, although external factors seem to stimulate the behavior. Sleep talking often occurs concurrently with other sleep disorders such as nightmares, confusion arousal, sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder. In rare cases, adult-onset frequent sleep-talking is associated with a psychiatric disorder or nocturnal seizures. Sleep talking associated with mental or medical illness occurs more commonly in persons over 25 years of age.

Treating Sleep Talking

In general, no treatment is necessary. However, if sleep talking is severe or persists over a long period of time, talk to your physician or health care provider about the problem. There may be an underlying medical explanation for your sleep talking (e.g. an undiagnosed sleep disorder, or debilitating anxiety or stress).

Certain measures can be taken to reduce the likelihood of a sleep talking episode. Following regular sleep schedule, getting adequate amounts of sleep, and practicing proper sleep hygiene can help reduce the frequency and severity of sleep talking. Also refrain from alcohol, heavy meals, and excessive amounts of stress to reduce sleep talking.

For bed partners and roommates, earplugs or white noise (such as a fan) may help.

Written by theFerkel